Humbled against the electrical storm

Graves lightning credit Mark GNew England weather can be very humbling, even to a lighthouse.

We camped the night of August 12-13 at Graves, in the middle of a spectacular electrical storm that swept New England.

From our position at the top of the lighthouse, we had the perfect place to watch the lightning near closer and closer to Boston, and then sweep across from Plymouth to Salem as the bolts of electricity struck the earth closer and closer to us.

At that point, given that we were at the highest point, more than 100 feet above the sea, and happened to be in a bronze enclosure that conducts electricity, we thought it better to descend to the stone tower. And we didn’t have a proper camera to catch the lightning show anyway.

At the same time, from Winthrop, Boston Herald photographer Mark Garfinkel rolled out of bed and set up his tripod to catch the lightning action over Graves. Above is his picture, a masterful piece of photography that captured the Graves beacon flashing as the lightning struck.

What a magnificent show of the power and majesty of nature.

See Mark’s blog, PictureBoston.com, and follow him on Twitter @PictureBoston.

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Peregrine falcons visit Graves Light

A peregrine falcon perches on the davit atop Graves Light late in the afternoon of National Lighthouse Day.

A peregrine falcon perches on the davit atop Graves Light late in the afternoon of National Lighthouse Day.

A close-up shot of the falcon, as seen from the kitchen (watch deck), between the outer railings.

A close-up shot of the falcon, as seen from the kitchen (watch deck), between the outer railings.

A pair of peregrine falcons visited Graves Light on National Lighthouse Day, treating us to some spectacular aerobatics.

The falcons perched on the bronze davit protruding from the floor of the lamp deck by the flag, and spiraled around the lighthouse in a series of amazing high-speed dives.

They made several swoops toward delicious-looking cormorants and seagulls, circling the oil house before coming back to rest on the topmost davit.

By some persistence and a lot of luck, we managed to snap a close-up picture of one of the birds flying past the outer deck of the watch room, and zoomed in so that you can see.

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Seal pup’s mama takes good care of baby on Graves Ledge

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Graves rises out of the fog

GL Graves fog Bill ONeilBill O’Neil, our reliable neighbor from Hull, just sent us this gem of Graves Light and Fog Station enveloped in a thick fog.

The rigging basket to the right belongs to CCI Construction.

This week, CCI is completing the most exciting painting project – the very top spire of the tower. Fearless!

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Grim reminder that it’s not all fun out here

The wrecked Emily Anne sat upside down in 50 feet of water.

The wrecked Emily Anne sat upside down in 50 feet of water.

The realities of the sea and weather remind us that not everything’s as fun as it seems at the mouth of Boston Harbor.

A salvage team just raised the wreck of Emily Anne, the trusty tugboat that helped us with restoration work in 2014. The tug sank just north of Graves Light in February, 2016. A quick-thinking pilot boat captain saved Emily Anne‘s crew as she sank, upside-down, in 50 feet of water.

Because the hulk was so close to the North Channel, the Coast Guard recommended that Emily Anne be raised so it wouldn’t be a threat to navigation. And so she was, in early June, with a crane pulling her to the surface and placing her on a barge.

From there, the barge took Emily Anne to a graving yard in Chelsea, where she’ll be broken up and sold for scrap.

These pictures tell the story of the salvage operation, with a couple shots from happier days when she helped with the Graves Light restoration in 2014.

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